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20121205
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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
to justice. where do we stand? >>> also, a new hollywood movie highlights the work of a cia analyst credited with tracking down osama bin laden, but here's a big but, it also sheds some very serious light on in-fighting in the spy agency. you got to hear it to believe it. let's go "outfront." >>> i'm ashleigh banfield in tonight for erin burnett. "outfront" tonight, our top developing story, we are just learning now that president obama and the white house or rather, president obama and the house speaker have spoken tonight. good news. this after they each fired another shot in the ongoing fight over how to resolve this fiscal cliff mess. cnn is now getting details about two new offers that were made and previously undisclosed, too. they kept a pretty tight lid on them. one of them by president obama, that was yesterday, then a counteroffer by the speaker. that was today. all of this as the president tells abc news tonight that he is confident that republicans will not hold middle class tax cuts hostage. so there's a lot of news that's all of a sudden coming out. after some relative quiet. o
blow in their own backyard. >>> a new movie has controversy surrounding around the cia analyst credited with finding osama bin laden and a sex abuse verdict topples the wall of secrecy that surrounded an ultraorthodox jewish sect. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> first this just coming into cnn. word that michigan's governor has just signed a law that many believe will significantly weaken union power in the state. one of the organized labor movements few remaining strongho strongholds. there was massive protests as lawmakers approved a so-called right to work law which allows members to forego paying dues. poppy harlow is in lansing in the state capital for us. you just spoke to the governor about all of this. what did he tell you? >> reporter: well, i spoke with the governor just ahead of that announcement where he confirmed that he indeed did sign this legislation into lawmaking michigan a right to work state. a sea change for this state, wolf. the governor saying this is a "opportunity" to stand up for workers and flying in the face of what many of those workers
team of katherine bigelow and mark bowe recreates how it all happened, from the female cia analyst who finally figured out where he was hiding to the navy s.e.a.l.s who killed him. >> there are two narratives about the location of osama bin laden. >> reporter: the controversy? the obama administration has faced accusations it gave undeserved access to the film makers. in real life, everyone involved in the hunt for bin laden remains sworn to secrecy. but the film makers say they got firsthand accounts. they just won't say exactly how that happened. >> i think as a reporter you would understand we take protecting our sources and sort of the exact methodology of our sourcing pretty seriously, just in the same way if i asked you how exactly did you source that story. >> reporter: katherine, when you hear mark talk this way, are you a journalist or a film maker? >> that's a good question. well, i certainly try to be as faithful to the research as possible and make a good movie and make a film that was timely. >> reporter: but how much access they got is the issue. >> obviously things went
's based on the story of a real-life c.i.a. agent who successfully tracked down the world's most wanted terrorist. there appears to be drama about the same spy off-screen as well. according to the "washington post," the unidentified operative was passed over for a big promotion, after the raid. and has ad argued with her colleagues over credit for the mission. so dan, a the movie premiers next week. but the woman is the central figure and hailed as the central figure because she pushed over and over for a year saying it's the curious that will lead us for bin laden. she is causing a bit of a stir because i guess she didn't get this promotion and hit replay all to e-mail announcement of the award that everyone is getting, she got one say, saying you tried to obstruct me, you fought me, only i deserve the award. maybe not good to shoot inside the tent in this one? >> bob: i thought the courier thing was george bush intelligence operation. >> andrea: is your name dana? >> bob: sorry. >> dana: it's okay. when i read about this today this is the first time i heard about her. it's hard for me
team of katherine big ga lo and mark bo, recreates how it all happened from the female cia analyst who finally figured out where he was hiding to the navy s.e.a.l.s who killed him. >> there are two narratives about the location of osama bin laden. >> reporter: the controversy? the obama administration has faced accusations it gave undeserved access to the filmmakers. in real life, everyone involved in the hunt for bin laden remains sworn to secrecy. but the filmmakers say they got firsthand accounts. they just won't say exactly how that happened. >> i think as a reporter you would understand we take prot t protecting our sources and sort of the exact methodology of our sourcing pretty seriously, just in the same way if i asked you how did you source that story. >> katherine, when you hear mark talk this way, are you a journalist or a filmmakerer? >> that's a good question. well, i certainly tried to be as faithful to the research as possible and make a good movie and make a film that was timely. >> reporter: but how much access they got is the issue. >> obviously things went wrong her
a chemical attack by assad would actually look like. we have a picture from former cia operative and contributor bob bayer to show you what the impact of a single shell of gas would be in launched on homs in syria. the large swath of the city that would be affected. it's estimated about 18,000 people would be killed in a day. let's get straight to barbara starr. and barbara, what have you learned tonight? >> well, you know, as tragic and serious as this is for the people of syria, this now has regional implications throughout the middle east. intelligence services from israel, turkey, jordan, lebanon, all the countries surrounding syria are talking with the united states around the clock about this very scenario because if there were to be god forbid a chemical attack, the concern is some could drift across borders. worse even as tragic as that would be, what if the regime collapses, terrorists move in, insurgent groups move in and grab some chemical material. they could take it across the borders into the neighbors countries and have a full fledged crisis in the region. >> there
an intervention in syria. we'll talk to a former cia officer about that and sanjay gupta. plus an activist inside syria and what he has to say about the potential threat, next. i'm doing my own sleep study. advil pm® or tylenol pm. the advil pm® guy is spending less time lying awake with annoying aches and pains and more time asleep. advil pm®. the difference is a better night's sleep. so, the 5.3-liter v8 silverado can tow up to 9,600 pounds? 315 horsepower. what's that in reindeer-power? [ laughs ] [ pencil scratches ] [ male announcer ] chevy's giving more. get the best offer of the year -- 0% apr financing for 60 months plus $1,000 holiday bonus cash. plus trade up for an additional $1,000 trade-in allowance. hurry. bonus cash ends january 2nd. [ female announcer ] holiday cookies are a big job. everything has to be just right. perfection is in the details. ♪ get to holiday fun faster with pillsbury cookie dough. how they'll live tomorrow. for more than 116 years, ameriprise financial has worked for their clients' futures. helping millions of americans retire on their terms. when they wa
by syria could lead to u.s. intervention. "outfront" tonight, fran town send who is on the cia and homeland security external advisory board and nolan. what do we think is going on right now? at what point are they in this process? >> so the assad regime has hundreds of metric tons of the building blocks of sarin. basically two big building blocks. there's isoproponol and phosphorous compounds. those are kept separately in order to keep things safe. but the assad regime in small, limited quantities appears to have combined those two chemicals to make deadly sarin nerve agent and has loaded them on to aerial bombs. >> if that is true, fran, it's a very provocative thing, is it provocative enough that the u.s. now has to consider action? >> well, you know, the administration has not made it clear. what the president has said is that the use of such weapons would be a red line for the united states and her allies. but it's not clear, short of use, is this preparation is the mixing of the precursor chemicals enough. as noah can tell you this is a very unstable substance, sarin gas. once it's mi
expert i've talked to in the fbi, and in the cia, glenn carl for example told me none of this torture worked. none of this enhanced interrogation worked. it did not, as cheney has alleged, lead to the killing of bin laden. it was counterproductive. it was damaging to our reputation and he's still lying about it. >> we haven't heard the last of that, have we? >> no, we haven't. >> how aggressive do you think lawmakers ought to be with that report? >> i think it ought to be at least portions of it, just like i thought the 9/11 commission portions of it should be made public. if we're not going to hold people accountable, we should at least let the american people know what was done in their name that basically constituted war crimes. >> getting back to cheney for a moment, his vision of international intervention, do you think that that really illustrates where the republican party is? >> i think the republican party is lost right now. wandsering in the desert, as it were. i don't think they can figure out -- i was on t
is that the hollywood people got access to cia operatives, to cia locations, that they had access to the navy s.e.a.l.s which they should not have had. i can't really go beyond that over to say the investigation has gone on an expanded. >> ahead, we're going to talk a little bit about this movie and whether or not that's the case. you know, i wonder if national security was really compromised. >> it's been a consistent conversation. not just about this movie, right? we've had it several times. is there information coming from the administration that constantly seems to be in a positive light and does that information go beyond and risk national security issues? i think it's a legitimate debate. >> okay. fine, what is it then? like what? we keep saying it's possible, possible national security. like what? >> we've covered it extensively. >> like what? >> the kill list, we've talked about the details of the operation to kill anwar al awlaki, the cyber attack on iran, whenever it's positive we get to hear a lot about it. >> the kill list was reported during the administration of president george w
the legacy of all of the bureaucrat particular power. >> former cia official says in recent month kim has purging 200 top officials, including powerful generals who had been loyal to his father. >> generals that are being elevated indeed are a bit more hardcore, hardlined than the generals that were originally in place. so if anything it's an indication that north korea is not going to be any more reform-minded under kim jong-unthan his spread says fors. >> in fact, he's a hardliner who got his fingerprints on the 2010 warship by north korea and the shelling of a disputedisland which killed four south koreans, wolf. he's kwn as a pretty bellicose general. >> people are worried about it right now. let's say they develop a missile with a warhead potentially capable of reaching the united states. what are the u.s. capabilities in terms of defending itself against such a missile? >> leon panetta said that the u.s. is very confident if north korea were to launch a missile at the united states, the american military could guard against it. that's a major reason why they are bolstering their pre
of terrorist ties. phillip mudd, a former cia and fbi counterterrorism official, says there's a huge concern over who to trust with chemical weapons. >> when you've got roughly 10% of the opposition in the. >>>s u.s. government is declaring are terrorist group you're going to be concerned. in any case like this, there's a lot of risk. >> reporter: but mudd says it's still better to train the rebels on how to handle those materials than to do nothing. and leonard specter says the u.s. and its allies are likely screening the individuals who are being trained very carefully, wofrl, at least that's the hope. >> despite all that, there's still a potential for these chemical weapons getting into the wrong hands. despite what the u.s. is trying to do. >> reporter: phillip mudd says if the syrian regime loses control of these weapons, that's a huge worry. if they fall into the hands of others who are not trusted by the u.s. or its allies they could float around the border to iraq or other potentially dangerous places where they don't have control over these things. if assad loses control of these th
's talk about the cia and whether there was a flap there with the talking points. focusing on susan rice does not get us on where we need to be on fixing the problems we have so that benghazi never occurs again. >> maria cardona and ron bonjean. thank you very much. >>> if the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff, we'll feel it even at our airports. flights could change, and quite frankly, not in a good way. in. in fact, in a recent survey, 95% of people who tried it agreed that it relieved their headache fast. visit fastreliefchallenge.com today for a special trial offer. you know how painful heartburn can be. for fast, long lasting relief, use doctor recommended gaviscon®. only gaviscon® forms a protective barrier that helps block stomach acid from splashing up- relieving the pain quickly. try fast, long lasting gaviscon®. (announcer) when subaru owners look in the mirror, relieving the pain quickly. they see more than themselves. so we celebrate our year-end with the "share the love" event. get a great deal on a new subaru and 250 dollars goes to your choice of five charities. by the en
doctor who was a c.i.a. informant and helped us hunt down osama bin laden? he's reportedly been tortured in a pakinstani prison, according to his brother. back in june, the doctor was sentenced to 33 years behind bars for conspiring against pakistan. now six months into his sentence, is the united states doing enough to secure his release? let's talk to fox news legal analyst, peter johnson, jr. >> he's being left for dead. >> steve: he is? >> he's an honorary american. 3,000 lives, more, on september 11. >> steve: he's being tortured. >> he tried to get bin laden and infiltrated through a dna ruse, hepatitis vaccine. now he's been tortured, burned with cigarettes, according to reports. he's been shocked. he was blindfolded for a year. he had his hands tied behind his back for a year. the state department says we're trying to get him out. we're trying to negotiate a release. there was a bill the defense authorization act of 2013 trying to limit the $800 million going to counter insurgency funds in pakistan and saying, listen, the department of defense has to sign off that they're doing e
, last night, a former cia officer, robert bear, was speaking to anderson cooper. he described what the use of sarin could do. here's more of what he had to say. >> one round and the dispersion on that could be -- depends on the wind -- but you could take out, let's say a city like homs, you could take out a third of the city in the first couple of hours. anderson, this is a highly toxic liquid. it's a persistent agent. it's absolutely completely deadly. >> reporter: now, we've heard repeatedly from u.s. administration officials, u.s. president barack obama, u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton that the use of chemical weapons in syria was a red line for which syria and the bashar al assad regime would face severe consequences if they ever did cross that red line and utilize chemical weapons against the people of syria. >> and we have no idea what those severe consequences would be, right? >> reporter: that's right, we don't. you know, people speculate that this would mean some type of military intervention, but we also know that a lot of world powers have not wanted to intervene
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)